Thoughts Welcomed

Posted
by PenelopeT, CNA (New) New

I love reading, especially on a topic that I'm passionate about. Lately, I've been reading up on articles on nursing today, just to add to the list of stressors I already have. I thought it would be a good idea just to see where everyone head's at. For my own entertainment, I started reading articles written by nurses, or other members of the medical field. I mean, don't get me wrong, I chose to be a nurse a long while ago. My passion for nursing can not easily be swayed by others' personal views and experiences in this profession. I feel that right now is a sensitive time for those thinking of going into nursing. I questioned myself and my abilities on whether I would even be a "fit" nurse. My CNA experience at a nursing home was one of those times I questioned everything. Even still, I think about the challenges in the future of healthcare. What does it take to be a culturally competent nurse? In your own words, please.

Leader25, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 39 years experience. 1,239 Posts

On 10/4/2021 at 10:05 PM, PenelopeT said:

culturally competent nurse

This phrase leave me speechless,what do you mean by it?A heart is a heart no matter what you call it,in Latin,English, or goobleygook.

 

Kitiger, RN

Specializes in Private Duty Pediatrics. Has 43 years experience. 1,639 Posts

On 10/4/2021 at 10:05 PM, PenelopeT said:

I love reading, especially on a topic that I'm passionate about. Lately, I've been reading up on articles on nursing today, just to add to the list of stressors I already have. I thought it would be a good idea just to see where everyone head's at. For my own entertainment, I started reading articles written by nurses, or other members of the medical field. I mean, don't get me wrong, I chose to be a nurse a long while ago. My passion for nursing can not easily be swayed by others' personal views and experiences in this profession. I feel that right now is a sensitive time for those thinking of going into nursing. I questioned myself and my abilities on whether I would even be a "fit" nurse. My CNA experience at a nursing home was one of those times I questioned everything. Even still, I think about the challenges in the future of healthcare. What does it take to be a culturally competent nurse? In your own words, please.

What do you think? Can you define "cultural competence"? What does that look like?

PenelopeT, CNA

11 Posts

@Leader25 - You're right, and maybe I should have rephrased that to "what does it take to be culturally competent in nursing practice?" 

In my opinion, a universal standard is lacking in our healthcare system. We all come from different backgrounds (I.e., cultures, religions, etc.), and our future demands for it. I want to ask what it's like for those in nursing. In my own experience, the eyes of the patient said it all. I was in admissions and registration prior to being in nursing school and It just burdened me having to use a translative device from Spanish to English. I know that I won't have the time before school to learn Spanish. Do you have any advice for those who are nonbilingual? I'm worried. 

Leader25, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 39 years experience. 1,239 Posts

On 10/4/2021 at 10:05 PM, PenelopeT said:

What does it take to be a culturally competent nurse?

That is so insulting and offensive,I would rather be sterotyped than pandered to.Just be the best nurse you can be ,work hard,ceus,certification.You would have a hard time in our unit that has tons of different languages,backgrounds,rituals,and do not exclude Appalachian.Be respectful,do your work that is it,forget the other bs.

Kitiger, RN

Specializes in Private Duty Pediatrics. Has 43 years experience. 1,639 Posts

On 11/10/2021 at 12:09 AM, PenelopeT said:

In my own experience, the eyes of the patient said it all. I was in admissions and registration prior to being in nursing school and It just burdened me having to use a translative device from Spanish to English. I know that I won't have the time before school to learn Spanish. Do you have any advice for those who are nonbilingual? I'm worried. 

Study nursing first. You can buy a good book on Spanish for the medical professional and work on basic phrases, but don't try to learn Spanish while you are a student nurse. After graduation, and after that first year or so, then study Spanish.

First things first.

Spanish is the second most dominant spoken language in the United States, so it's a good choice. But - depending on where you live - other languages are also very helpful.