Leaving Job - Advice For Giving Notice

Updated | Posted
by FashionablyL8, CNA, LPN Member

Has 1 years experience.

leaving-job-writing-notice-help.jpg.b505b427317a170d46eceabeae09844a.jpg

I've finally decided to leave a job- "job #1"- that I've been at for 8+ years. I became a licensed LPN several months ago, and got another job as an LPN- "job #2". However, I was offered a significant raise to stay on at job#1 in my current position, which was med room staff and direct care support (I was MAP certified long before becoming a nurse). For a while, I've been thinking of leaving job #1- the $$ is less than job #2 and I've found that I love job #2- my coworkers are awesome, I'm learning a lot and it feels great to be working as a nurse. Although many of my tasks at job #1 are similar to nursing, it's not the same. 

The last time I worked at job #1, the decision was made easier for me. When I arrived at work, my supervisor informed me that she would be in the med room and I would be floor staff that night. They had also switched a lot of residents from the floor and changed everything around, without telling any of the staff. I am always in the med room even if my supervisor is there- I'm the most qualified person to giving meds since I'm the only nurse there. I've been in the med room for months before becoming a nurse and do an excellent job, also doing more than my share of direct care. Because this was so unusual, I asked my supervisor if I would continue to be in the med room on subsequent shifts. She replied that she couldn't say whether I would be in the med room or not. It sounded like it was a toss-up between myself and other less qualified staff. I told her that I enjoy my current position and am not looking to go back to working only on the floor and left it at that. I feel that it was disrespectful and wrong to suddenly change my job description for no reason without telling me. This supervisor has done something similar before, switching me without warning from a location that I had worked in for years with the same residents, who loved me. The problems seem to have started when I began nursing school. I get the feeling that she resents me because I am a nurse now and she likes to feel as if she knows more than anyone. 

I've decided to give my notice the next time I work. I'm sure I could stay in the med room if I went over the supervisor's head. It's just not worth it to me. However, I am undecided on whether to mention this as a factor in my leaving. I don't want to give the supervisor the satisfaction of getting rid of me if that is her intention, but also feel that the people in charge should be aware. Her treatment of staff, sudden switching of schedules/floors/tasks and favoritism have caused other people to leave also. My husband says I would seem petty, since whether I'm on the floor or in the med room, I made the same amount of $$. 

I'm interested in hearing opinions on this. Do you all think I'm justified in being annoyed? And should I include this in reasons for leaving? Thanks for any thoughts. It may seem ridiculous but I'm kind of obsessing about this.

amoLucia

Specializes in retired LTC. 7,641 Posts

K I S S is best!

Keeping It Short & Simple for a resignation is best. Yes, you're disappointed & angry, prob VERY rightfully so. But ... nobody's gonna care but you! 

That supervisor has that authority to make changes. In the next 40 years or so of your career, you'll run into many more just like her. So might as well just accept it. 

Also, N E V E R   E V E R   leave something in writing (or even conversation) that could come back and bite you. You'll be labelled as a trouble maker or spouting 'sour grapes'. You also don't reeeallly know why others have left.

You like job#2, and you might want to go back to job#1 some time in the future. Leave your options open & unencumbered.

Go graciously. And good luck.

chare

3,317 Posts

2 hours ago, FashionablyL8 said:

[...] 

I'm interested in hearing opinions on this. Do you all think I'm justified in being annoyed? And should I include this in reasons for leaving? Thanks for any thoughts. It may seem ridiculous but I'm kind of obsessing about this.

I think you have every right to be annoyed.  As for addressing this in your resignation I agree with @amoLucia.  Keep it short and simple as nothing good will come out of you airing your grievances in your resignation.  

Best wishes.

FashionablyL8, CNA, LPN

Has 1 years experience. 129 Posts

Hi amoLucia and Chare,

Thank you both for your advice!

Very good point that I will encounter other supervisors like this one, amoLucia. I need to learn to deal with things like this in a way that doesn't burn any bridges. 

Chare, you're right that nothing good will come of my bringing this up. I hadn't really thought that through, what my motives really were and if they were realistic. 

You both helped put things in perspective for me and I truly appreciate it. 

 

amoLucia

Specializes in retired LTC. 7,641 Posts

Just thinking - check out your COBRA health insurance coverage with job #1. Don't know when your new job will cover you (if chosen). 

Again, don't give them any  ammunition to shoot you like if you'll need references for future jobs and school applications.

FashionablyL8, CNA, LPN

Has 1 years experience. 129 Posts

AmoLucia, I have my own insurance, but that's a major consideration for anyone leaving a job if they need the insurance. 

The references are important, especially since I've been there for so long. Even though it's not a nursing job, it's passing meds and caring for ppl, so I think some employers would be skeptical if I didn't want them to be contacted. 

Thanks again- you always give great advice 🙂.

John2018

Specializes in Occupational Health Nursing. Has 4 years experience. 102 Posts

Don't mention your real reason for leaving, just keep it short, neutral and basic. If you ever feel like writing it down again to your notice or resignation letter...breathe and read the comments in this post again. 

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 30 years experience. 2,693 Posts

What type of facility is it that has non-nurse med passes?

Ditto on the previous advice to keep your resignation as professional as possible and don't go into the sour details. Never burn a bridge...

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in OB-Gyn/Primary Care/Ambulatory Leadership. Has 16 years experience. 14,148 Posts

10 minutes ago, Jedrnurse said:

What type of facility is it that has non-nurse med passes?

Lots of LTCs and SNFs utilize CNAs who have their MAP certification. 

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 30 years experience. 2,693 Posts

30 minutes ago, klone said:

Lots of LTCs and SNFs utilize CNAs who have their MAP certification. 

Yikes. I've worked for human service agencies that have group homes utilizing MAP, but in LTC/SNF it seems like it'd be potentially risky with that model.

FashionablyL8, CNA, LPN

Has 1 years experience. 129 Posts

It's a home for DD individuals with more severe physical issues- we have lots of G-tubes, nonambulatory residents, hospice. I've always thought- even as a MAP cert staff- that it's risky to have non-nurses passing meds. MAP education is maybe a 10 hr course if I remember correctly. No pharm. It's much less extensive than CNA education, which seems crazy since it qualifies people to give meds. I think it can really be a disservice to our DD and elderly population. Additionally, many MAP cert staff see themselves as "just like nurses" and make medical judgements that they have no business making. Sorry, it's a real issue and it gets to me.

I think it would be terrifying to have MAP staff in LTC/SNF. The med pass is so heavy and lots of BP/cardiac meds that need VS checks before. I've met MAP staff that don't understand the rationale for that 🙄

Thank you to all of you for the advice. I've written a nice basic resignation letter with no complaints and remember these replies during the conversation and refrain from saying anything negative. 

JBMmom, MSN, NP

Specializes in New NP Hospitalist, Critical care, Med-surg, LTC. Has 10 years experience. 4 Articles; 2,020 Posts

18 minutes ago, FashionablyL8 said:

I've written a nice basic resignation letter with no complaints and remember these replies during the conversation and refrain from saying anything negative. 

Always the best way to go. People move on from jobs for any number of reasons, best wishes in the next phase of your career. As others have mentioned, you weren't wrong to feel annoyed that things ended the way they did, but taking the high road is the better option for you.