I am an RN in home health. A BSN isn't required but would it be a waste of money/time to get my BSN?

Posted
by Ashlee59 Member Nurse Student

Specializes in Home health.

So basically I plan to stick with private duty home health and school cases. That's what I like and feel more comfortable with. I am also considering SNF PRN or as travel assignment. I know things could change in the future to where I change my mind and end up working in a hospital. Just never know what the future holds. But I'm currently an RN in private duty. A BSN isn't required but is it a waste of time and money if I plan to stick with private duty?

Edited by Ashlee59
Additional info added

Elektra6, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Home Health, LTC, subacute. Has 17 years experience. 567 Posts

I got my BSN right after my RN (was an LPN for 7 yrs) even though I stayed in homecare. I thought if I wanted to go into a supervisor position or switch jobs it would be required.  I did it really cheap at WGU online. I don’t regret it but I’m glad I didn’t spend a lot either. I was in “school mode” so it was pretty easy. Most RN-BSN programs are pretty affordable so I would go for it if you are motivated.  

Ashlee59

Specializes in Home health. 47 Posts

23 hours ago, Elektra6 said:

I got my BSN right after my RN (was an LPN for 7 yrs) even though I stayed in homecare. I thought if I wanted to go into a supervisor position or switch jobs it would be required.  I did it really cheap at WGU online. I don’t regret it but I’m glad I didn’t spend a lot either. I was in “school mode” so it was pretty easy. Most RN-BSN programs are pretty affordable so I would go for it if you are motivated.  

If you don't mind me asking, do you do visits or private duty? I do private duty.  I feel like with private duty my pay would not change with a BSN. I know with a hospital and like you said if I choose to go somewhere else I will get paid more with a BSN. How long was wgu?

Elektra6, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Home Health, LTC, subacute. Has 17 years experience. 567 Posts

Private duty. You are right. They didn’t care about having a BSN. WGU took me 3 semesters working full time which is a year and a half.  

Kitiger, RN

Specializes in Private Duty Pediatrics. Has 43 years experience. 1,639 Posts

On 12/31/2021 at 2:47 PM, Ashlee59 said:

So basically I plan to stick with private duty home health and school cases. That's what I like and feel more comfortable with. I am also considering SNF PRN or as travel assignment. I know things could change in the future to where I change my mind and end up working in a hospital. Just never know what the future holds. But I'm currently an RN in private duty. A BSN isn't required but is it a waste of time and money if I plan to stick with private duty?

I went back & forth with this about 5 years ago, even took some general ED classes. On the one hand, a BSN would open more doors. On the other hand, my diploma RN is good for private duty home nursing. And you're right, a BSN would not increase my pay.

I finally decided not to go for it.  I am so easily distracted, and time management is so difficult for me, that I would truly struggle in a hospital or SNF.

I enjoy the work that I do. How many can say that?  

I look to retire in another 4 years. The cost in time, effort, and money just isn't worth it for me.

Ashlee59

Specializes in Home health. 47 Posts

7 hours ago, Kitiger said:

I went back & forth with this about 5 years ago, even took some general ED classes. On the one hand, a BSN would open more doors. On the other hand, my diploma RN is good for private duty home nursing. And you're right, a BSN would not increase my pay.

I finally decided not to go for it.  I am so easily distracted, and time management is so difficult for me, that I would truly struggle in a hospital or SNF.

I enjoy the work that I do. How many can say that?  

I look to retire in another 4 years. The cost in time, effort, and money just isn't worth it for me.

You're an RN in  private duty too? That's makes me feel good . So many people mention hospitals but I love the one on one patient care ,the freedom ,and the slow pace. I did snf and loved the fact that I was around other people, constant skill building, and time flying by because you're so busy. Have you always only done private duty? The bachelor degree programs are surprisingly not very expensive at all. I feel like I should hop on it while the price is great. Never know what the future holds I might get offered something that requires a BSN . Who knows. 

Edited by Ashlee59
Additional info added

Ashlee59

Specializes in Home health. 47 Posts

8 hours ago, Elektra6 said:

Private duty. You are right. They didn’t care about having a BSN. WGU took me 3 semesters working full time which is a year and a half.  

Right that's why I wonder if it's worth me getting a BSN or not since in home health it doesn't matter? Since it's not required in home health.I agree the BSN program isn't very expensive so I feel I should hop on it while the prices are good because I never know what the future holds. I could get an offer that requires a BSN. And the BSN does open more doors. What would you do in my situation?

Kitiger, RN

Specializes in Private Duty Pediatrics. Has 43 years experience. 1,639 Posts

1 hour ago, Ashlee59 said:

Right that's why I wonder if it's worth me getting a BSN or not since in home health it doesn't matter? Since it's not required in home health. I agree the BSN program isn't very expensive so I feel I should hop on it while the prices are good because I never know what the future holds. I could get an offer that requires a BSN. And the BSN does open more doors. What would you do in my situation?

Going on for the BSN was too expensive when I first graduated ('79). I would have done it had it been more affordable. 

If I were younger and could afford it, I probably would do it.  I wouldn't do it now because the doors it would open are not the doors I want to use.

Kitiger, RN

Specializes in Private Duty Pediatrics. Has 43 years experience. 1,639 Posts

2 hours ago, Ashlee59 said:

You're an RN in  private duty too? That's makes me feel good . So many people mention hospitals but I love the one on one patient care ,the freedom ,and the slow pace. I did snf and loved the fact that I was around other people, constant skill building, and time flying by because you're so busy. Have you always only done private duty? The bachelor degree programs are surprisingly not very expensive at all. I feel like I should hop on it while the price is great. Never know what the future holds I might get offered something that requires a BSN . Who knows. 

I've worked for an agency since 1980. The first few years were to staff a unit in the hospital, but - since about 1986 - I have only worked private duty home care. 

Even in the hospital, I did better in ICU, Peds ICU, etc., because there I only had 2 or 3 patients. Home care is 1 or 2 patients. I know how to stay busy, so the time flies. I'm not bored.

guest1143647

Specializes in Peds. Has 18 years experience. 163 Posts

I wondered this myself but eventually got the BSN. I have about 27 years more to work before retirement. 
I started out in private duty but did work occasionally in a LTC facility until 2009, so it was all I knew. I now work in a rehab facility, and I don’t like it. I do not like the paperwork required, my time management sucks, but most importantly I hate supervising CNA’s . I’m totally not cut out for that. I like being responsible for my work ONLY. Not to mention there are not enough CNA in the facility, so I end up changing residents and still have to pass medication. I don’t mind changing a resident, but I can’t do both. 
 

Having the BSN allowed me to try the other side of homecare- skilled visits. The VNA in my area only hires nurses with a BSN.

I say get it just in case. What happens if private duty agencies require a BSN in a few years?

What happens when you get tired of the low pay and want to earn more? At year 15 of working in PDN,that’s what exactly happened to me. I got tired of getting no raises, astronomically high health insurance, and not to mention my skills outside of Pdn were going “dry”. 
I felt like a new nurse all over again when I started working in the rehab center. WOW! was a Lifevest? Cardio net? How do I draw labs from a PICC? What is a bladder scan? I didn’t even know how to do a 12 lead EKG because we don’t really use any of those skills in Pdn. 

Ashlee59

Specializes in Home health. 47 Posts

6 hours ago, Runsoncoffee99 said:

I wondered this myself but eventually got the BSN. I have about 27 years more to work before retirement. 
I started out in private duty but did work occasionally in a LTC facility until 2009, so it was all I knew. I now work in a rehab facility, and I don’t like it. I do not like the paperwork required, my time management sucks, but most importantly I hate supervising CNA’s . I’m totally not cut out for that. I like being responsible for my work ONLY. Not to mention there are not enough CNA in the facility, so I end up changing residents and still have to pass medication. I don’t mind changing a resident, but I can’t do both. 
 

Having the BSN allowed me to try the other side of homecare- skilled visits. The VNA in my area only hires nurses with a BSN.

I say get it just in case. What happens if private duty agencies require a BSN in a few years?

What happens when you get tired of the low pay and want to earn more? At year 15 of working in PDN,that’s what exactly happened to me. I got tired of getting no raises, astronomically high health insurance, and not to mention my skills outside of Pdn were going “dry”. 
I felt like a new nurse all over again when I started working in the rehab center. WOW! was a Lifevest? Cardio net? How do I draw labs from a PICC? What is a bladder scan? I didn’t even know how to do a 12 lead EKG because we don’t really use any of those skills in Pdn. 

Wow thank you so much . Wonderful perspectives and very informative.  I will take this into consideration.  I like private duty because like yourself I did work in a snf . I did not like supervising CNA.  Alot of times they are jealous of the nurses but that's a whole nother can of worms . But anyways, I only like being responsible for my work and my work only. The only issue I have with PDN  is the pay.  Other than that it is something I absolutely enjoy and it's alot of fun.

With the 12 lead ekg, life vest and cardionet did they train you on those things?

 

We so get central lines in PDN where I work aswell as IV, wounds, and ventilators .

For skilled nurse visits were you oriented on how to use oasis and on skills? I hear thr documentation is alot.

AdobeRN

1,281 Posts

On 1/4/2022 at 9:33 AM, Kitiger said:

If I were younger and could afford it, I probably would do it.  I wouldn't do it now because the doors it would open are not the doors I want to use.

Same!  At my age (mid 50's) and the FT job I am at now (FT school nurse - I do PDN on the side for extra money) it would not be beneficial at all for me to go back to school.  I plan on working until retirement as a school nurse. 

Now if I were younger yes, I would totally do it.  My daughter is currently in a nursing program - I told her to not stop and keep going to get that BSN. The community colleges in our area make it so easy now to transition right into the surrounding University BSN programs and with her being 23 years old, that BSN behind her name will open up so many more opportunities for her in nursing.