Seeking Constructive Feedback

Posted

So, I have been an EMT and have also worked in an emergency room since 2007. Over time, I became the go to person for hard sticks in adults, babies and difficult to access patients. Even though I am very good at IV's, we all have our bad days were we are not able to get an IV even if the vein jumped out to help us! Everyone has their own technique and ways they like to start a line (sitting, setup, locating a vein).

So. Last evening while starting a line, the patients nurse (who is extremely nice) was telling me which vein to access, how to access it, how to hold the needle, tried to put the tegaderm on for me , tape the IV, etc. Internally I almost lost it. She then proceed to grab my hand and tell me "the way I like to do it is once I get a flash, I remove the needle and float the IV in". What? šŸ˜²I understand you don't know my skill set, but you never insert yourself and surely don't hoover over and grab someone's hand unless asked. Needless to say, the vein blew. So then she says to me, "o well we can go into another room and practice". I politely said, "no that's OK, I don't need practice". I felt bad because I didn't say it in the most nice way, but I was very irritated and annoyed. She is literally hovering over my procedure space telling me how to start the IV!

So my question is, for those who have experienced working with someone new on shift who don't know your skill set, how do you politely let them know "Thank you, I know what I am doing, now back off" but yet be open to way they might do things?

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 30 years experience. 2,693 Posts

Maybe " Thanks. It's always nice to hearĀ somebody else's hacks/tricks. I've been doing this for (fill-in-the-blank) years but once in a whileĀ IĀ just hit someĀ bad luck."

I think it establishes your experience without alienating the co-worker.

LibraSunCNM, MSN

Specializes in OB. Has 10 years experience. 1,588 Posts

Good grief, if she wants to micromanage that much, she's welcome to do it herself!

That's what I wanted to tell her, but I was trying to be a team player. One thing I try not to be as a clinician is the person who says "well, this is how I normally do it." Well then YOU do it!

JBMmom, MSN, NP

Specializes in New NP Hospitalist, Critical care, Med-surg, LTC. Has 10 years experience. 4 Articles; 2,020 Posts

I think Jedrnurse had a very diplomatic response. It does seem a bit unusual (and annoying, I'm sure), that someone would ask for assistance and then feel it was appropriate to try to micromanage the person helping.Ā 

amoLucia

Specializes in retired LTC. 7,641 Posts

Funny thing - I rarely ever liked someone to watch me do the actual stick. I usually just toldĀ them 'being watched makes me nervous'.

I was pretty decent with IVs being the rare CERTIFIED nurse working on 11-7. Had LOTS of practice.

JKL33

6,129 Posts

12 hours ago, TECHTORNHOPEFULLY said:

she then proceed to grab my hand and tell me "the way I like to do it is once I get a flash, I remove the needle and float the IV in".

"Well, there's your first problem..."Ā  šŸ™Š

Anyway...I can't see myself being in this situation. I would've headed it off long before anyone touched my hands. Either my help is needed or it isn't and I would be direct, though without any intention of being rude. Example:

She: "Put it in the [forearm/hand/AC]"

Me: I'm going to find the best looking site that I can get on the first try

Etc.

If anyone suggested to me that I would be attempting the "float the tip into the soft tissue of the arm" technique I would be real lucky if I didn't say, "I will NOT be doing that."

This is all just so inappropriate that I would try not to be rude, but I would be direct in a way that someone might find rather blunt.

John2018

Specializes in Occupational Health Nursing. Has 4 years experience. 102 Posts

No words are needed at all. Just show up and show them how efficient you are in your work.Ā 

Davey Do

Specializes in Psych (25 years), Medical (15 years). Has 43 years experience. 1 Article; 9,658 Posts

On 3/9/2022 at 7:50 AM, TECHTORNHOPEFULLY said:

So my question is, for those who have experienced working with someone new on shift who don't know your skill set, how do you politely let them know

"Thank you, I know what I am doing, now back off"....

....newbie!"

mtmkjr, BSN

324 Posts

"I was called in to help with a difficult IV access. There must have been a mistake - let me know if you're unable to get it and I'll be happy to come back."

Edited by mtmkjr